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A family of goldsmiths and artists

Iron work as a legacy

 

On September 21, 1876: Birth of Julio Luis Jesus González Pellicer in Barcelona. Antonio González, his grandfather, a goldsmith of Galician origin, settles in Catalonia during the first half of the 19th century.

Concordio González Puig (1832-1896), his father, works in Barcelona as goldsmith and iron worker, involved occasionally in sculpture.


Pilar Pellicer Fenés (1846-1928), his mother, of Barcelonan stock, comes from a family of artists: His brother José Luis Pellicer (1842-1902) is one of the most important Catalan designers and illustrators of the late 19th century; He is also the son-in-law of painter Ramon Marit Alsina.

Concordio initiated his four children to his trade: Joan (1868-1908), Pilar (1870-1951), Dolores called Lola (1874-1962) and Julio (1876-1942). All working in the family business. Julio learns to work with various metals, producing crafts and jewelry in a style characteristic of modernisme catalan.

 

An artistic youth

 

1891-1892: Julio is enrolled in applied arts classes at the School of Fine Arts in Barcelona. Joan and Julio participate in the first General Exposition of Fine ­Arts and Industry. At the National Exposition of Artistic Industries of Barcelona, the C. González and Sons company receives an honorable mention for the submission of decorative drawings. Julio, Pilar and Lola receive a second class medal in the ironwork section for their flowers in metal.



1893: At the Colombian Exposition in Chicago, Julio and Joan receive the bronze medal for their decorative art objects and their jewelry.



1894: At the 2nd General Exposition of Fine Arts and Industry at Barcelona, Joan and Julio receive the gold medal for their cast objects. During a visit to Madrid, Julio meets the Uruguayan painter and sculptor Joaquín Torres-García (1874-1949), founder of the Constructive Universalism movement. Simultaneously to the goldsmithing, the González brothers attend evening courses in design and painting at the School of Fine Arts in Barcelona.


1896: Concordio González dies on September 3 at the age of 65. Joan, the oldest son, 28, takes over the family business.



Early artistic steps

 

In the spring, the 3rd General Exposition of Fine Arts and Industry of Barcelona welcomes promising young artists: Pablo Picasso – who presents the First Communion (Barcelona, Picasso Museum) – and Torres-Garcia. Julio González presents a jewelry piece, (Bouquet of flowers, cast and embossed iron).


1897: The González brothers frequent the artistic cabaret of Pere Romeu, Els Quatre Gats (The Four Cats), inspired by the Parisian Chat Noir. They become associated with the young intellectual and artistic of Barcelona. González wants to become a painter. He is drawn to a group of artists and writers from the avant-garde milieu, The Cénacle, involving in particular the painters Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Josep Pijoan and Ramon Pichot, the poet Eduardo Marquina and the musician Antoni Ribera.

Next Chapter

Discovering artistic Paris - 1901 - 1913

Iron work as a legacy

  On September 21, 1876: Birth of Julio Luis Jesus González Pellicer in Barcelona. Antonio González, his grandfather, a goldsmith of Galician origin, settles in Catalonia during the first half of the 19th century. Concordio González Puig (1832-1896), his father, works in Barcelona as goldsmith and iron worker, involved occasionally in sculpture.
Pilar Pellicer Fenés (1846-1928), his mother, of Barcelonan stock, comes from a family of artists: His brother José Luis Pellicer (1842-1902) is one of the most important Catalan designers and illustrators of the late 19th century; He is also the son-in-law of painter Ramon Marit Alsina.
Concordio initiated his four children to his trade: Joan (1868-1908), Pilar (1870-1951), Dolores called Lola (1874-1962) and Julio (1876-1942). All working in the family business. Julio learns to work with various metals, producing crafts and jewelry in a style characteristic of modernisme catalan.  

An artistic youth

  1891-1892: Julio is enrolled in applied arts classes at the School of Fine Arts in Barcelona. Joan and Julio participate in the first General Exposition of Fine ­Arts and Industry. At the National Exposition of Artistic Industries of Barcelona, the C. González and Sons company receives an honorable mention for the submission of decorative drawings. Julio, Pilar and Lola receive a second class medal in the ironwork section for their flowers in metal.
1893: At the Colombian Exposition in Chicago, Julio and Joan receive the bronze medal for their decorative art objects and their jewelry.
1894: At the 2nd General Exposition of Fine Arts and Industry at Barcelona, Joan and Julio receive the gold medal for their cast objects. During a visit to Madrid, Julio meets the Uruguayan painter and sculptor Joaquín Torres-García (1874-1949), founder of the Constructive Universalism movement. Simultaneously to the goldsmithing, the González brothers attend evening courses in design and painting at the School of Fine Arts in Barcelona.
1896: Concordio González dies on September 3 at the age of 65. Joan, the oldest son, 28, takes over the family business.


Early artistic steps

  In the spring, the 3rd General Exposition of Fine Arts and Industry of Barcelona welcomes promising young artists: Pablo Picasso - who presents the First Communion (Barcelona, Picasso Museum) - and Torres-Garcia. Julio González presents a jewelry piece, (Bouquet of flowers, cast and embossed iron).
1897: The González brothers frequent the artistic cabaret of Pere Romeu, Els Quatre Gats (The Four Cats), inspired by the Parisian Chat Noir. They become associated with the young intellectual and artistic of Barcelona. González wants to become a painter. He is drawn to a group of artists and writers from the avant-garde milieu, The Cénacle, involving in particular the painters Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Josep Pijoan and Ramon Pichot, the poet Eduardo Marquina and the musician Antoni Ribera.